Staying Active Over 40 Is Key – Overweight Muscular vs. Underweight Low Muscle Mass

Is My Weight Gain Caused by Slowed Metabolism While Aging?

Metabolism is the process through which your body converts food into energy. Even when at rest, you need some energy to aid in breathing, repairing cells, and circulating blood.

You’ve probably heard that when you hit 40, it’s downhill for your weight. The inexplicable force on the metabolism rate begins to grind slower each year from 30 years onwards. Is slowed metabolism the cause of weight gain at old age?

Here’s what you should know: studies show that the rate of metabolism slowdown in older age is rather minimal. Additionally, weight gain in midlife is not due to slower metabolism. The reality is that, as we age, we get less active.

Regardless of whether you have a slow or fast metabolic rate, our bodies are synchronized to store excess energy in fat cells. Taking in more calories with reduced body activity (older people are lesser active) expands your body for weight gain.

Generally, you don’t have any control over your body’s metabolism. However, to keep a healthy weight, you should reduce and control your calorie intake. Additionally, you need to be more active. Engage in regular physical activity to burn your calories. In fact, people with fast metabolism are more active.

Metabolic Adaptation: The Undiagnosed Epidemic

The weight loss formula is simple: burn calories as much as you can consume, and you will probably drop pounds in no time. Metabolism is the energy-producing force that runs faster than Usain Bolt!

Metabolic adaptation is the slowing of the metabolism rate despite several efforts exerted for one to lose weight. This slowing of metabolism causes people to regain weight if they fail to keep up with high levels of exercise and restrictions of major calorie intake.

Metabolic adaptation is a biological response process to starvation. For example, in the availability of plentiful food, the body doesn’t see it necessary to store calories in the form of fat. However, in times of famine, the body’s metabolism process uses the minimum number of calories to maintain the biological homeostasis. The rest is stored as fat for later use to avoid starvation.

Ultimately, metabolic adaptation is one part of dieting and metabolism. Weight loss or weight gain depend on the collection of metabolic adaptation traits.

The takeaway: your body metabolism will adapt to weight loss; however, that doesn’t mean that you will gain it all back or stop shedding pounds. Getting enough sleep, upgrading cardio workouts, and managing stress will help you in overcoming metabolic adaptation.

Overweight and Muscular Rather Than Thin and With Low Muscle Mass

“There are two certainties in life: taxes and death.” However, people should also add loss of muscle mass to that list.

Don’t get worried about sarcopenia. It’s an age-related muscle loss condition, a natural part of aging. Remember that you should rather become overweight and muscular than thin and low in muscle weight.

The reason being, low muscle weight means that you’ve less mobility and greater weakness. These two results of low muscle weight increase your risk of falls and fractures. Research by the American Society showed that people with sarcopenia are 2.3 times more prone to low-trauma fractures from a slight fall (broken hip, leg, arm, collarbone or wrist).

However, losing your muscle mass doesn’t mean that it’s all gone forever. You can still increase your muscle mass despite the aging consequences. It takes work, planning and dedication to rebuild the muscles and maintain them.

To lose weight and also maintain your muscles mass at the same time, you need the right type of exercise and the appropriate diet. Muscle mass is the biggest contributor to resting metabolism. It helps in burning more calories than fat.

Being underweight presents more health concerns as you age than being overweight with muscle suprisingly!

Let’s Talk Stretching And Post Workout

How To Know If You Are Stretching Wrong?

You’re stretching, which is excellent, but are you doing it correctly? Peek below to learn how to do it and if you’re stretching wrong.

Common Ways You May Be Stretching Wrong

-You Might Be Only Stretching Post-Workout.

Many people stretch at the end of their workout but forget to do it at the beginning. You shouldn’t only limit stretching exercises to after weights or a run. Do it beforehand to loosen your muscles and increase your range of motion.

-You Don’t Warm Up First.

Jumping (literally) into the pre-workout stretches without a proper warm-up can set you up for more pain than gain. Before you get into your mini stretch set, always include a warm-up.

-You’re doing the Wrong Type of Stretch

Doing the wrong stretch at the wrong time can result in injury during either your stretch or workout.

-You Hold Your Stretches Too Long (Or Not Long Enough).

Not holding a stretch long enough can render it ineffective, but too long can actually make you stiffer, putting you at risk of injury. The safest bet is 30 seconds per stretch, which will work to lengthen your tissue and muscle fibers.

Recap: Warm-up and do dynamic stretching before your workout, and prepare your mind and body for the exercise ahead. After you’ve finished and cooled down, implement some static or moving stretching to jump-start muscle recovery. Doing both will do you big favors by making you less stiff and prone to injury. Ready, set, stretch!

Afterburn effect

The afterburn effect is also known as the oxygen debt. Its scientific name is excess post-exercise oxygen consumption.  By definition, the afterburn effect is the amount of oxygen required to bring the body functions back to a resting state.

During intense exercises projected to burn body calories and keep the body fit, the metabolic rate increases. After the exercise, your metabolism rate doesn’t go back to resting phase immediately, however, it remains elevated for some time. This in turn causes an increase in calorie burn, even after you’ve done some stretching, showered and eaten post-workout snacks.

To be specific, the additional energy expenditure occurring after the workout is called afterburn effect.

Its important to be mindful of this and make sure you supplement yourself after a workout. Consuming too little will lead to cravings to overeat later in the day due to your body burning more calories then normal. 20 grams of protein with one serving of carbs is recommended after a workout.

When and how does the afterburn effect occur?

Increased physical activity makes the muscles increase demand for oxygen that oxidizes the carbohydrates and the fats, producing some significant energy required for movement.

Oxygen debt occurs during an intense exercise, the body will require more oxygen than breathing could provide. The gap in demand for oxygen by the muscles and the actual available oxygen delivered stimulates the afterburn effect.

The advantage of the afterburn effect is that this fascinating activity by the body burns extra calories in your body the right way. How to do this? Train hard and intensely (not forgetting proper technique obviously), and incorporate high intensity aerobic exercise and/or HIIT into your program.

Fitness Is A Lifestyle! Key Facts To Make It A Sustainable One!

For many fitness is a struggle and a subject of difficulty. Its not easy figuring out how to build a healthy body and I can honestly say I struggled for over a decade to figure out the true meaning of what it means to work towards your fitness. My Fitness journey started when I was 17 and I was convinced that drinking slim fast was actually going to make me lose weight and get me the strong body that I or anyone else desires. However after dropping 100lbs to 220lbs by the time I was 20, I realized over the years into my 20’s that fitness isn’t just something you do for a certain point in your life and stop all together. Its a lifestyle that needs to be adopted. As a result of not understanding this at first, my weight fluctuated between 240 to 260lbs for some years in my 20’s. I stopped working out at some points and then kept coming back to it. As I mentioned in another blog post, I had a perception in my early 20’s that just going to the gym and doing cardio was working out. So while I worked out here and there, I wasn’t working out as passionate as I am now which affected my weight. I didn’t consider fitness an important lifestyle in my 20’s and that is the reason I never got my body and muscle toned the way I wanted. I was missing a key part of working out and I want to share some key facts that can help set your mind in the right direction for success.

The Key to Lasting Change/Results

Focusing on and being consistent with healthy habits is the absolute best action you can take, right now, to attain the results you’re after and achieve lasting change. Simple yet specific dietary and physical activity habits like drinking enough water each day, including colorful vegetables on your plates each day or getting in at least 10,000 steps, are all great places to start. You don’t have to do them all at once, either. Pick one or two healthy habits to work on for a few weeks; make it so easy at first that you physically can’t fail. You’ll distract yourself from the constant worrying about the scale, and when you focus on these things, lasting and meaningful change will follow. Consistency is found in those small, repetitive, seemingly unimportant decisions you make each and every day. Slow it down, stop putting so much pressure on yourself and make the decisions that allow you to feel your best. Whether that means losing weight, getting stronger or faster, or simply trying to make better dietary choices for yourself each day, your success on this journey will depend on your consistency over the long-haul.

How to deal with setbacks?

In the world of health and fitness, setbacks happen to everyone. The most important thing is how you choose to deal with and respond to those setbacks. Real progress is made when you accept that health and fitness isn’t linear and that perfection isn’t possible. Accept responsibility for your actions, take a deep breath, and vow to get back on track. Nothing is as black and white as we make it seem, and you are not good or bad if you made poor food choices or skipped a workout. Acknowledge your shortcomings and take the time to figure out how you might avoid a particular setback in the future. Have a plan: create a workout schedule, make time in your week to shop for and prep whole and healthy meals ahead of time, set aside time in your workday to get in some extra steps, movement or stretching– whatever it may be. Make the commitment to yourself to keep moving forward and not let setbacks be the reason you give up on your health and fitness journey.

Why You Can’t Fail (Cause It’s a Learning Experience, Everything You Do Gets You a Little Closer to Your Goal)

Overcome the fear of failure: you CAN’T fail! We all learn from our errors, and no one is perfect enough not to commit any mistakes. Learning from failures is important. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to be your own failures; learn also from the mistakes and errors of the people who went before you.

You should be proud of your mistakes. Don’t feel horrible because of mere errors. Mistakes help us gain knowledge in our fields. Any successful individual will tell you for free that without some failures along the way, the journey wouldn’t be what it is today.

Here are some of the reasons why failures and everything you do will get you closer to your goal:

·         Failures trigger creativity and enable us to think outside the box.

·         Mistakes and errors make us resilient; we can understand the adversity of overcoming challenges.

·         Failure teaches us humanity; we are all humans and mistakes are inevitable.

·         Every failure provides references; we are always better each day when we try something

·         Failure offers us new ideas; they push our limits in addition to offering new things that inspire us

Ultimately, everything we do should add courage. Failure makes us wiser. Thomas Edison said that, “I’ve not failed. I’ve found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Mistakes are true references!

And as John Powell said, “The only real mistake is one we learn nothing from.”