Staying Active Over 40 Is Key – Overweight Muscular vs. Underweight Low Muscle Mass

Is My Weight Gain Caused by Slowed Metabolism While Aging?

Metabolism is the process through which your body converts food into energy. Even when at rest, you need some energy to aid in breathing, repairing cells, and circulating blood.

You’ve probably heard that when you hit 40, it’s downhill for your weight. The inexplicable force on the metabolism rate begins to grind slower each year from 30 years onwards. Is slowed metabolism the cause of weight gain at old age?

Here’s what you should know: studies show that the rate of metabolism slowdown in older age is rather minimal. Additionally, weight gain in midlife is not due to slower metabolism. The reality is that, as we age, we get less active.

Regardless of whether you have a slow or fast metabolic rate, our bodies are synchronized to store excess energy in fat cells. Taking in more calories with reduced body activity (older people are lesser active) expands your body for weight gain.

Generally, you don’t have any control over your body’s metabolism. However, to keep a healthy weight, you should reduce and control your calorie intake. Additionally, you need to be more active. Engage in regular physical activity to burn your calories. In fact, people with fast metabolism are more active.

Metabolic Adaptation: The Undiagnosed Epidemic

The weight loss formula is simple: burn calories as much as you can consume, and you will probably drop pounds in no time. Metabolism is the energy-producing force that runs faster than Usain Bolt!

Metabolic adaptation is the slowing of the metabolism rate despite several efforts exerted for one to lose weight. This slowing of metabolism causes people to regain weight if they fail to keep up with high levels of exercise and restrictions of major calorie intake.

Metabolic adaptation is a biological response process to starvation. For example, in the availability of plentiful food, the body doesn’t see it necessary to store calories in the form of fat. However, in times of famine, the body’s metabolism process uses the minimum number of calories to maintain the biological homeostasis. The rest is stored as fat for later use to avoid starvation.

Ultimately, metabolic adaptation is one part of dieting and metabolism. Weight loss or weight gain depend on the collection of metabolic adaptation traits.

The takeaway: your body metabolism will adapt to weight loss; however, that doesn’t mean that you will gain it all back or stop shedding pounds. Getting enough sleep, upgrading cardio workouts, and managing stress will help you in overcoming metabolic adaptation.

Overweight and Muscular Rather Than Thin and With Low Muscle Mass

“There are two certainties in life: taxes and death.” However, people should also add loss of muscle mass to that list.

Don’t get worried about sarcopenia. It’s an age-related muscle loss condition, a natural part of aging. Remember that you should rather become overweight and muscular than thin and low in muscle weight.

The reason being, low muscle weight means that you’ve less mobility and greater weakness. These two results of low muscle weight increase your risk of falls and fractures. Research by the American Society showed that people with sarcopenia are 2.3 times more prone to low-trauma fractures from a slight fall (broken hip, leg, arm, collarbone or wrist).

However, losing your muscle mass doesn’t mean that it’s all gone forever. You can still increase your muscle mass despite the aging consequences. It takes work, planning and dedication to rebuild the muscles and maintain them.

To lose weight and also maintain your muscles mass at the same time, you need the right type of exercise and the appropriate diet. Muscle mass is the biggest contributor to resting metabolism. It helps in burning more calories than fat.

Being underweight presents more health concerns as you age than being overweight with muscle suprisingly!

Let’s Talk Stretching And Post Workout

How To Know If You Are Stretching Wrong?

You’re stretching, which is excellent, but are you doing it correctly? Peek below to learn how to do it and if you’re stretching wrong.

Common Ways You May Be Stretching Wrong

-You Might Be Only Stretching Post-Workout.

Many people stretch at the end of their workout but forget to do it at the beginning. You shouldn’t only limit stretching exercises to after weights or a run. Do it beforehand to loosen your muscles and increase your range of motion.

-You Don’t Warm Up First.

Jumping (literally) into the pre-workout stretches without a proper warm-up can set you up for more pain than gain. Before you get into your mini stretch set, always include a warm-up.

-You’re doing the Wrong Type of Stretch

Doing the wrong stretch at the wrong time can result in injury during either your stretch or workout.

-You Hold Your Stretches Too Long (Or Not Long Enough).

Not holding a stretch long enough can render it ineffective, but too long can actually make you stiffer, putting you at risk of injury. The safest bet is 30 seconds per stretch, which will work to lengthen your tissue and muscle fibers.

Recap: Warm-up and do dynamic stretching before your workout, and prepare your mind and body for the exercise ahead. After you’ve finished and cooled down, implement some static or moving stretching to jump-start muscle recovery. Doing both will do you big favors by making you less stiff and prone to injury. Ready, set, stretch!

Afterburn effect

The afterburn effect is also known as the oxygen debt. Its scientific name is excess post-exercise oxygen consumption.  By definition, the afterburn effect is the amount of oxygen required to bring the body functions back to a resting state.

During intense exercises projected to burn body calories and keep the body fit, the metabolic rate increases. After the exercise, your metabolism rate doesn’t go back to resting phase immediately, however, it remains elevated for some time. This in turn causes an increase in calorie burn, even after you’ve done some stretching, showered and eaten post-workout snacks.

To be specific, the additional energy expenditure occurring after the workout is called afterburn effect.

Its important to be mindful of this and make sure you supplement yourself after a workout. Consuming too little will lead to cravings to overeat later in the day due to your body burning more calories then normal. 20 grams of protein with one serving of carbs is recommended after a workout.

When and how does the afterburn effect occur?

Increased physical activity makes the muscles increase demand for oxygen that oxidizes the carbohydrates and the fats, producing some significant energy required for movement.

Oxygen debt occurs during an intense exercise, the body will require more oxygen than breathing could provide. The gap in demand for oxygen by the muscles and the actual available oxygen delivered stimulates the afterburn effect.

The advantage of the afterburn effect is that this fascinating activity by the body burns extra calories in your body the right way. How to do this? Train hard and intensely (not forgetting proper technique obviously), and incorporate high intensity aerobic exercise and/or HIIT into your program.

Salt, Carbs, Fibers Info And Eating Healthy Doesn’t Have To Be Expensive

Salt – Should I avoid it?

Salt is commonly thought of as something to avoid entirely, as too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. And while it is true that an excess of salt in the diet increases the risk of high blood pressure and heart failure, it turns out that salt is actually necessary for the human body for a myriad of reasons. You need salt to maintain a healthy blood pressure, a proper balance of fluids in the blood and optimum muscle and nerve function. That being said, most of us already get plenty of salt in our diets that we needn’t be worried about adding more. Additionally, when it comes to the nutritional value of salt, both sea salt and pink himalayan salt are commonly seen as the healthier alternative to plain old table salt, but that just isn’t the case. Although salts do vary somewhat in their mineral content, pink himalayan salt and sea salt are both nutritionally very similar to table salt in how much sodium they contain. It’s a good idea to keep an eye on your salt intake, but no, you don’t need to avoid it altogether.

Do Carbs Make Me Fat and Ill?

No, you don’t have to eliminate carbs from your diet entirely in order to lose weight, no matter what your friend doing the Keto diet tells you. We need carbohydrates to function at our best in the long-term. Here’s the catch, though: refined carbs like white bread and pasta have literally been stripped of all their nutritious elements. So not only do these types of carbs spike your blood sugar, but they are linked to inflammation in the body, and they really aren’t adding any value to your diet either. So, choose your carbs wisely! Instead of refined carbs, opt for high-quality carbohydrates like quinoa, oats, sweet potatoes, bananas or legumes and skip the processed grains and sugars. And remember: any food can cause weight gain if you eat too much.

Types of Fiber and Where to Get Them, Benefits

Nutrition and healthy eating needs more fibers. You’ve probably heard this before. However, do you know why fiber is essential for your health, and which one in particular?

Dietary fiber is a roughage or bulk that includes parts of the plant foods that your body cannot digest or absorb. Fiber is not digested.

Fibers are commonly classified into the following.

Soluble fiber: This kind of fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like material. It lowers the blood glucose and cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber is found in peas, apples, oats, citrus fruits, barely, psyllium and carrots.

Insoluble fiber: This category of fiber promotes movement of food materials through the digestive tract. It increases the stool bulk. It is of great benefit to those struggling with constipation or the irregular stools. Wheat bran, whole-wheat flour, beans, vegetables and nuts are good sources of insoluble fiber.

Benefits of High-Fiber Diet

Dietary fiber:

·         Normalizes the bowel movements making it easier to pass stool as well as decrease the chances of constipation.

·         Helps in maintaining the bowel health; the high-fiber diet lowers the risk of developing small pouches in the colon and hemorrhoids

·         Lowers the cholesterol levels.

·         Controls the blood sugar levels

·         Helps in achieving the desired weight

·         Lengthens one’s life; it reduces the chance of cardiovascular disease and all cancers.

“Eating Healthy Is Sooo Expensive” (Or Is It?)

Many people believe that eating healthy is so expensive, but that is not the case: eating healthy might cost you money but eating unhealthy can cost you your life!

Eating healthy is possible if you are on a budget. Eating healthy can be cheaper sometimes, so choose wisely the foods you are eating. There are many nutritious foods and they can be stocked easily on a flexible budget.

The following tips will enable you to get your grocery on a low bill while your family enjoys a healthier diet.

·         Pay attention to portion sizes and compare your options: a bag of apples cost less than a big bag of chips, a bag of apples can last for more than one week, an apple a day keeps the doctor away.

·         Plan before purchase:  avoid impulse purchase; plan your meals before shopping.

·         Buy cheaper proteins: protein products are the most expensive food in the shopping list, so choose the cheapest ones.

·         Buy in season: know what is in season; the cost will be lower and the vegetables will be fresher.

Finally, remember that however more expensive the product is, you cannot equalize it with your health. Choosing healthier food is not a luxury no matter your budget.